Show Notes

Show Notes: Grace Douglas, Story Producer- Unscripted TV, Episode 9

The LA-based Unscripted TV and Associate Story Producer Grace Douglas shares her journey to feeling confident and creatively fulfilled in her work. 

What’s inside:

  • 2:10: Where are you calling from/What are you working on right now?
  • 2:37 : What does a typical day look like for you look?
  • 7:07 : What is it that you like about working in unscripted TV?

Unscripted TV 

  • 8:44 : Do you have a day-to-day routine?
  • 14:45: How did “You are enough” resonate with you?

Sanford Meisner Acting Technique

  • 18:55 : What was your lifestyle growing up like compared to your lifestyle now?
  • 21:24 : Did you ever have a back-up plan?
  • 23:35 : Are you a big risk-taker?

Disney+ Free Solo

  • 25:04 : Do you think going into the courthouse and approaching the judge was risky?

Trial transcipt

  • 29:32 : Was the biggest risk you’ve taken moving out to LA?
  • 36:40 : What are some rewards from your career that your younger self would be blown-away by?
  • 39:49: How do you manage your financial life?
  • 44:41 : Do you think you’re paid well, as an Associate Producer?
  • 44:53 : Do you set your own rate?
  • 45:47 : Have you “made it”?
  • 49:55 : Who have you been inspired by? See it to be it. 

Allison Janney

Brené Brown

Elizabeth Gilbert: Curiosity and the Passion Fallacy on the Good Life Project Podcast

Elizabeth Gilbert defining Hobby, Job, Career, Vocation

OWN Super Soul Sundays: Elizabeth Gilbert

Brené Brown on Tim Ferris’ Podcast

  • 57:01 : What is your recommendation for things people should see?

Ahmanson Theatre

John Leguizamo’s Latin History for Morons

Mike Birbiglia: The New One

Indecent by Paula Vogel

Paula Vogel

Jerry Jay Cranford

Rebecca Taichman

Paula Vogel’s Program Notes

“Theatre is how we remember. Lastly a few words on what I believe, I believe the purpose of theatre is to wound our memories so we can remember. We form memories as enfants. We can remember when we acquire language to retrieve that memory. I hope that the acquisition of Yiddish in the rain scene helps us remember the culture and lives that existed before 1940. Theatre is living memory. It is said that in the last moments of our existence, our lives flash before our eyes. I am a lucky woman, the theatre has been my life. And so, I hope one of the last images I see will be the moments of these actors, this troupe, this journey. Thank you for joining us.” – Paula Vogel 

  • 1:01:19: How can listeners connect with you?

Connect with Grace

…on Instagram!

Key Quotes:

  • “That’s my favorite thing about my job–no two days are the same.”
  • “My parents–to this day–have no idea what my job is.” 
  • “Humans are so boring!” 
  • “How do you tell the best possible story?”
  • “I love what I do because I love to learn…I kind of become a mini-expert every few months on something new.” 
  • “I use my [Fine Arts] degree every single day.” 
  • “Community is very important and you create your own community.”
  • “I moved out to LA ready to live in a box and be unemployed–and I found jobs, I found ways to make money.”
  • “[If you’re young and you want to move,] if you don’t go now, you never will! Now is the time to go. Every day that passes, it becomes harder to leave.” 
  • “The most thrilling things [about my career] are: how much I get to learn, how much I still love learning, and the community that I’ve created here.” 
  • “Don’t be afraid to pursue what you want and what you think would be good.”
  • “I’m so creatively satisfied.”
  • “I loved acting because I love storytelling–and storytelling is what I do every day.”
  • “If you hang your identity on ‘making it,’ what do you do after that?”
  • “It’s very easy to compare your life with the lives of other people and feel very discouraged about where you are.”
  • “It’s easy to compare yourself. And that’s the thief of joy.”
  • “I’m inspired by people who go after things that they want.”
  • “I think people need to have a season subscription to a local theatre.”

Support the DYBP Podcast! 

…on Instagram! …on Facebook! …and Twitter! 

Let your voice be heard: 

  • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
  • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely. Email Jen, 213-915-6883 text or call

DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith

Show Notes

Show Notes: Tim Murray, LA-based Actor and Comedian, Episode 8

Tim Murray, an LA-based actor and comedian, tells of his journey from disappointment to forgiveness–starting over, creating opportunities, and never stopping the hustle. 

What’s inside: 

  • 2:35 : Where are you calling from?
  • 3:00 : You’re doing Voldemort the Musical in London, is that your show?
  • 3:48 : Did you take the opportunity of being in London to also do some stand-up?
  • 4:45 : Were the audiences in London different from the ones in the U.S?
  • 6:50 : How was the transition back-and-forth from the scripted Voldemort musical to stand-up?
  • 8:45 : How long have you been back in LA since that gig? Was that the last thing you’ve done?
  • 10:00 : What’s your stand-up show called?
  • 12:10 : What’s a typical day in your life now? Is your show over?
  • 13:50 : What’s next after this tour? 
  • 14:10 : Does social media play a big part in advertising your show?
  • 15:06 : What’s the biggest difference between how you grew up and your lifestyle now?
  • 16:15 : Do your parents understand your industry?
  • 16:50 : Did you ever have a backup plan, and what would that be?
  • 18:35 : Do you get to explore different passions through creative endeavors?
  • 19:25 : Do you have a certain feeling towards back-up plans or survival jobs in general?
  • 21:40 : What are your thoughts on owning your ‘side hustle’ or ‘back-up plan’?
  • 25:27 : What’s the biggest risk you’ve had to take to get where you are now?
  • 26:35 : How did you prepare for the risk of moving to LA (if you were prepared at all)?
  • 28:25: Did you eventually graduate college?
  • 30:30 : What have you done that your younger self would be surprised by?
  • 36:40 : Where are you between ‘starving artist’ and ‘celebrity’? Have you “made it?”
  • 38:10 : If you got another big gig, what would you do differently to keep yourself from falling into a depressed state afterwards?
  • 40:50 : What role does getting lucky and being at the right place at the right time play for you?
  • 42:37 : Who have you seen that you knew you could be, if anyone? See it to be it. 
  • 46:53 : Is there an artistic endeavor you would recommend to listeners?
  • 48:25: Do you have any advice for young hopefuls in this career?
  • 49:44 : How are listeners able to connect with you?
  • 50:03 : What’s the update on your career since losing your job during the global crisis?

Mentioned in this Episode:

Key Quotes:

  • “With stand-up, it’s so transparent. There is no ‘fourth wall’.”
  • “What we learn as theatre students is in some ways so beneficial to doing stand-up, but in other ways is truly so opposite.”
  • “[Stand-up] is similar to when you’re doing a soliloquy in Shakespeare and you’re really looking someone in the eyes.”
  • “It’s overwhelming to see how many people from your life want to support you–it’s really nice.”
  • “That’s the key to making this whole thing happen: creating a buzz around yourself.”
  • “I wasn’t even the 3rd most talented person at my high school.” 
  • “You have to approach this without looking back–just go full-force, head-first”
  • “I think I’m most successful when I don’t think about it. When I just try to keep going forward and any ‘back-up plans’ I have are momentary.” 
  • “You are a freelance artist…there are going to be highs and lows–but you can find ways to enjoy the job you’re doing.”
  • “It’s about finding that thing that challenges you and makes you feel good.”
  • “Our brains make us think ‘yeah, this is great–but I was supposed to be on Broadway.’…but there is no ‘supposed to.’”
  • “There is no real reason to reflect on whether or not you’ve made it, because no matter what happens you always have to keep hustling, you always have to keep going.”
  • “I’m not even sure that I like acting that much!” 
  • “When I was at the regional theatre doing the show, I wasn’t as happy as when I got the call–and then I thought ‘okay, how do I navigate this? What does this mean?” 
  • “You have to create as many opportunities for yourself as possible.”
  • “You can’t control being in the right place at the right time–so concentrate on what you can control.” 
  • “There are so many opportunities now to create.” 
  • “Keep believing in yourself and keep creating opportunities.” 
  • “Keep putting as much out into the world as you can.” 
  • “Keep pushing yourself and moving forward–and ignore that voice in your head that says that you can’t.”
  • “If something’s making you feel excited, then it’s right. If something’s not, then maybe you have to pivot.” 

Connect with ! 

…on Instagram!

…on Twitter

…on YouTube! 

…on Facebook!

Support the DYBP Podcast! 

…on Instagram!

…on Facebook! 

…and Twitter! 

Let your voice be heard: 

  • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
  • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely.
  • Email Jen
  • 213-915-6883 text or call

DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith

Show Notes

Episode 7 – Katie McClellan, TV/Film/Theatre and Voiceover Actor

LA-based actor and voiceover artist Katie McClellan explains how one can survive and thrive in the artistic field without running out of fuel; Using her experience in the arts, she shares how upholding one’s self worth can lead to a healthy outlook and the potential to find one’s own “bread and butter.” 

What’s inside: 

  • 5:14 : Where are you calling from/located? Where were you before that?
  • 6:38: Did you plan on moving to LA after school?
  • 6:53 : What’s the latest project you’ve been working on? 
  • 7:40 : How often do you do voice work?
  • 7:58 : What are ADR (Automated Dialogue Replacement) loop groups? 
  • 9:08 : What is a typical day like for you? 
  • 11:48 : Is working as a Personal Assistant a popular side job in LA?
  • 12:28 : Do you make the majority of your living off of voice-over and acting work?
  • 12:43 : How is the lifestyle you grew up in different from your lifestyle now?
  • 14:38 : Do you have a back-up plan?
  • 16:00 : Is the attention to mental and physical health something you’ve always done?
  • 17:03 : How do you stay positive during the ups and downs of your career?
  • 18:10 : Did you have to give anything up to be where you are today?
  • 20:33 : What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken to get where you are now? 
  • 22:03 : When you look back on the last decade, what are the highlights? 
  • 25:08 : How do you manage such an unpredictable career?
  • 26:00 : What’s rewarding and what keeps you in this field?
  • 27:24 : Is there anything that you’ve done that your younger self would find unbelievable?
  • 29:14 : Do you think you’ve “made it?”
  • 30:37 : What are some irksome misconceptions about what you do?
  • 31:45 : How do you manage the ups and downs of the finances of freelance work?
  • 33:10 : Is frequently visiting family a benefit from your flexible schedule?
  • 34:04 : Are you able to do voiceover work while you’re home?
  • 35:05 : Who inspired you? See it to be it. 
  • 37:02 : What kind of advice would you give to a young person considering this field?
  • 38:10 : What artistic endeavors would you recommend?
  • 41:07 : Do people need a backup plan in this industry? What should those considering that have in mind?
  • 42:38 : How can listeners connect with you if they want to reach out?

Mentioned in this Episode:

Key Quotes:

  • “I do think it’s important that your side job–or whatever it is that’s paying your bills–is something that doesn’t drain you, something that doesn’t make you dread getting up in the morning, something that doesn’t make you resentful, all of that; because that will only have negative effects on everything else.” 
  • “It may take awhile to find something you enjoy, but–like I was saying earlier–I think self-care as an actor is so paramount. If you’re doing something to pay your bills that’s toxic to your well-being, then you have to find something else.”
  • “Make sure that you’re a whole person outside of this…have hobbies, see people who aren’t actors or involved in the industry. Stay well-rounded. Having other, really meaningful components to your life is really important.”
  • “If you’re self-worth is riding on this job, then you’re gonna be shit out of luck pretty quickly; we have just little control over where this train goes.”
  • “[A “smaller” co-star role] can turn into anything, you just never know.”
  • “When people talk about being in the arts in general, I’ve always hated that ‘starving artist’/’suffering for your art’ kind of mentality–I don’t think I would’ve worked as much as I have at this point if I didn’t have that mindset. Suffering for one’s art just doesn’t make sense and when the resulting art entirely depends on you being a functional person, you have to take care of yourself.
  • “That’s how to have longevity in this career long-term–not tying your self-worth into this job.”

Connect with Katie

…on Instagram! 

…on her website!

Support the DYBP Podcast! 

…on Instagram!

…on Facebook! 

…and Twitter! 

Let your voice be heard: 

  • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
  • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely.
  • Email Jen
  • 213-915-6883 text or call

DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith

Show Notes

Episode 6 – Ross Evans, Screenwriter

LA-based screenwriter Ross Evans tells of his journey from actor to director to writer and every step in between–illustrating how changing paths brought him to his current career. 

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What’s inside: 

  • :56 WME/William Morris Endeavor
  • 1:10 WGA/Writers Guild of America
  • 2:10 AEA Agreements/99 Seat Theatres/Showcase Code
  • 6:00: Where are you calling from?
  • 6:20 : What’s a typical day in your life like?
  • 8:53 : What type of musical are you working on?
  • 9:20 : What’s the difference between how you grew up in Indiana and your lifestyle now?
  • 13:22 : Did your parents support your path? 
  • 15:18 : How did you get from musical theatre major to LA?
  • 20:12 : How long were you in New York?
  • 21:28 : When did you decide you didn’t want to go back to school for playwriting?
  • 24:45 : Did working towards something you didn’t really want hone the skills of your true passion? 
  • 25:35 : What’s the difference between screenwriting and playwriting? 
  • 30:47 : What are the biggest successes that you’ve had?
  • 31:02 : How long did you wait tables?
  • 33:47 : What is the ‘Blacklist’ and what are ‘spec scripts’?
  • 35:10 : What are some risks you had to take to be where you’re at?
  • 36:55 : How did you get to creating your own theatre company after school and associate directing on broadway?
  • 41:52 : Do you think you could’ve gone as far if you had skipped college and gone straight to New York?
  • 42:27 : Did being around other young artists at school propel you?
  • 43:00 : Do you think your younger self could imagine you where you’re at now?
  • 44:50 : Do you feel like you’ve “made it?”
  • 46:38  : Did you experience rejection as well as luck?
  • 49:19 : Is there anyone who inspired you to be where you are now?
  • 50:20 : Are you mentoring anyone now?
  • 51:15 : Is your job freelance? 
  • 51:38 : Any advice for young people considering the arts?
  • 54:22 : Any artistic endeavors you can recommend?
  • 55:45 : What are some of your works that people can consume?

Mentioned in this Episode:

Key Quotes:

  • “I didn’t know that my job existed.” 
  • “I think it’s important to constantly have a self-analysis of, ‘Is the path that I’m on right?’ Changing your path isn’t necessarily giving up on that path, it’s just learning more about yourself” 
  • “The more specific you can get on what your path is, the easier it is to chase it.” 
  • “If you flip a thousand coins over ten times each, there is an unbelievably high probability that one of those coins will land on ‘heads’ every single time–and that coin will be more than happy to sell you books about how their success was possible and how you, too, can flip on ‘heads’ every time. But it was just luck.”
  • “I don’t think luck is a bad thing, it’s just part of our lives.”
  • “‘What am I trying to say? What am I trying to communicate? How can I use my voice to say things that I care about?’ That was the turning point in my writing.”
  • “You can make a good living as a screenwriter.” 
  • “I think the only people who complain about ‘selling out’ are people who never had anything to sell.” 
  • “Writers come from everywhere.”
  • “You learn a lot in academia, but nowhere near as much as working and doing it.”
  • “I learned more in my first year in Hollywood than the rest of my life combined.”
  • “Success is always changing..that’s why it’s so hard to chase.”
  • “As soon as you achieve something, you look at the higher peak–you can’t do that. You have to celebrate where you are.” 
  • “There are hundreds if not thousands of writers who are making a good living who have never had a script produced.”
  • “Risk is looking at these little opportunities that you’re given and just striking them.”
  • “I think there’s something very powerful to being in the same room where high-level art is being created.”
  • “No one ever feels like they’ve ‘made it’ from the inside.”
  • “You’re not bad because the first things you create are bad. You just need to keep working and getting better.”
  • “The thing that you love, you’re going to find success in that.”

Connect with Ross by emailing the podcast! 

Support the DYBP Podcast! 

…on Instagram! …on Facebook!  …and Twitter! 

Let your voice be heard: 

  • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
  • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely.
  • Email Jen
  • 213-915-6883 text or call

DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith

Show Notes

Sarah Schreiber, Episode 5 Show Notes

Sarah Schreiber shares the twists and turns of her career–from performing in theatre to hosting on the Home Shopping Network to now announcing for WWE backstage–highlighting the importance of experiencing everything, being proud of your work, and finding your “sweet spot.” 

What’s inside: 

  • 2:40 : Where are you located? What brought you there?
  • 3:42 : What’s a typical day-in-the-life for you?
  • 4:45 : How did you end up on David Letterman? 
  • 10:15 : What is the story behind your unexpected Shakespeare performance? 
  • 16:41 : Is there a difference between how you grew up and your lifestyle now? 
  • 20:22 : Have you ever had to take a leap of faith? 
  • 26:47 : What did you have to ditch to get the success that you have?
  • 29:50 : Do you think you would be able to appreciate the “slow-down” of Florida as much if your path leading up to that was different? Would you have made the same decisions?
  • 31:20 : What kind of rewards have you gained that would blow your younger self away?
  • 36:33 : What is WWE and what’s it like to announce for them?
  • 43:20: Do you feel like you’ve “made it”? 
  • 46:08 : How does self-care fit itself into moments of rejection and/or unemployment?
  • 47:42 : How has your physical health and state been affected by the industry?
  • 52:51 : Who inspired you? See it to be it. 
  • 55:54 : Would one need specific education to do what you do?
  • 57:53 : Any recommendations for listeners? 
  • 59:35 : How can listeners connect with you and follow what you’re doing? 

Mentioned in this Episode:

Key Quotes:

  • “Don’t overthink! Don’t overthink. That’s been an amazing lesson.” 
  • “I never let myself overthink it…I knew I just had to do it.” 
  • “A support system is key to everything.”
  • “Every job you do, you add another skill”
  • “Live theatre–there’s nothing like it.” 
  • “I give everything to my parents–200%–I am where I am because of them”
  • “Theatre–I chose theatre. Because no matter what, that’s my passion.”
  • “I think it’s important in building yourself as a human–having core values–and not letting your career take over your whole life.”
  • “Slowing down is great…it’s healthy for my mental state because my career is constant. Constant.”
  • “Everything has been a reward. Even the downfalls–which is what they taught me.”
  • “I saw myself in musical theatre. I saw myself on that path–believing that was it…You think that’s what you’re supposed to do, but just wait. Take the opportunities. Don’t be afraid to explore other things in the field.” 
  • “Don’t be so blindsided on one goal.”
  • “Sometimes you push away from the door that’s opening because you keep banging on the one that’s solidly locked.” 
  • “What we do–we have to wear armor. Because my emotion is in everything I do. My love and passion is in every moment of my career.”
  • “Mental care is so important.”
  • “The extreme of anything is unhealthy.” 
  • “Theatre is my therapy” 
  • “Don’t be ashamed of work that is not your career”
  • “Work brings career opportunities when you least expect it”
  • “I saw my determination, I saw where I wanted to go–but honestly I could NEVER have seen all of the things I’ve done.” 
  • “We are selling ourselves. We are a business.” 
  • “It’s about keeping up–sending out those emails, reconnecting with those people…They remember those things. People remember your work ethic.”
  • “See it all. Live it all.” 
  • “Everything in the field is inspiring. Be inspired. Be excited. Question. Listen–two ears, one mouth.” 
  • (On WWE:) “It’s Shakespeare and Gladiator in one!”

Connect with Sarah

…and Twitter! 

Let your voice be heard: 

  • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
  • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely.
  • Email Jen
  • 213-915-6883 text or call

DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith

DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon