Podcast, Show Notes

Sara Andreas, Broadway Actor/Dancer & Julie Fleischer, TV Script Supervisor/Writer, Episode 17

Broadway actor/dancer, Sara Andreas and her mom, Julie Fleischer, TV script supervisor and writer talk about career risks, terrifying New York apartments, and finding success with family support and the other women in their lives. Mother’s Day episode 4 of 4.

Podcast, Show Notes

Carrie Compere, Actor/Mom, Episode 16

Broadway and TV/Film actor and super-mom Carrie Compere shares her incredible story of risk-taking, working to put food on the table, and finding family balance. Mother’s Day episode 3 of 4.

What’s inside: 

  • Key Quotes:
  • “I’m gone for so long that every time I come back home I have to get re-acclimated!” 
  • “Everything that I do is a dedication to my mom–her memory and her legacy.”
  • “Slowly but surely I got into a rhythm of auditioning–casting directors started knowing who I was, my name was starting to get out there.”
  • “I’m so heavily passionate about what I do–I try not to rely on a ‘plan B’”
  • “My family, we learned to create our own balance.”
  • “All I knew was where I come from, and I didn’t have anyone tangible that I could say ‘oh, they made it!’”
  • “To have the support of people who were close to me and knew me best–honest people, I knew the weight of it.” 
  • “Our words are so important–you have to be careful about what you speak.” 
  • “That one thing that you say can be the seed that is planted that shoots them off to their destiny and purpose.”
  • “If there is anyone thinking about pursuing a career as a performer, I would have to say: These are super difficult times; however, the internet is your friend. Sign up for classes, masterclasses, TV/film communities, online readings looking for actors, learn your monologues, test yourself–go out there and take pictures of yourself. Tap into all of the creativity you can if you feel like it.” 
  • “Be prepared for when things get back together again.” 
  • “Talk to people who encourage and uplift you–who believe in you and will be honest with you.” 
  • Support the DYBP Podcast! 
  • …on Instagram! …on Facebook! …and Twitter! 
  • Let your voice be heard: 
  • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
  • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely. Email Jen, 213-915-6883 text or call
  • DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon
  • DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith
Podcast, Show Notes

Lindsay Levine, Casting Director/Educator, Episode 15

Lindsay Levine–New York-based casting director, educator, and mom–describes her transition from performer to casting director and her journey through the theatre world–including how she’s found parenting along the way. Mother’s Day episode 2 of 4.

What’s inside: 

Key Quotes:

  • “I went to about 165 auditions before I got Mama Mia.” 
  • “About a year in, I realized I probably wasn’t long for the world of performing…but I tried to take the opportunity of being in a big production to learn who all of those people were.” 
  • “[When you have a kid] your life changes, and no one else’s does.” 
  • “In this business it’s really hard to control your own schedule.”
  • “As a casting director, you’re given a lot of opportunities to teach.” 
  • “I realized I would have the opportunity to be a part of a lot more Broadways shows and work with people I had grown up idolizing in a different way, rather than as a performer.”
  • “I got my Equity card doing children’s theatre.” 
  • “You don’t need to give up on your dream, but it’s okay for your dream to change.”
  • “There could be more conversations about listening to the world and letting your dreams change and become something different.” 
  • “At what point do you listen to the doors that are opening for you?”
  • “It’s okay to let go of the identity of being a performer and you can still be in theatre–or not!”
  • “Being a parent in theatre may not look exactly like how your childhood looked like…but it’s possible.”

Support the DYBP Podcast! 

…on Instagram! …on Facebook! …and Twitter! 

Let your voice be heard: 

  • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
  • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely. Email Jen, 213-915-6883 text or call

DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith

Podcast, Show Notes

Anne Cofell Saunders, TV Writer/Executive Producer, Episode 14

Anne Cofell Saunders–a television writer, executive producer, and mom of two daughters–tells her story of growing up in a small town in South Dakota to becoming an award-winning and respected television writer and producer in Hollywood. Mother’s Day episode one of four.

What’s inside: 

Star Trek: Discovery 

Discovery Writers

The Boys 

  • 2:15 : What’s a typical day in your life like now?
  • 2:55: What’s your “new normal” as a working mom?
  • 4:00 : What are some of the rewards of this time?
  • 4:43 : How is this time going to change things for TV in the future?
  • 5:30 : What was your previous routine as a writer and executive producer?
  • 12:41 : Are you considered a freelancer?
  • 13:58 : As a leader, do a lot of decisions land on you?
  • 14:54 : How is your lifestyle different from how you grew up?
  • 20:28 : Did you know in graduate school that you would pursue television writing?
  • 24:20 : Can you detect a writer’s personality when you meet other artists?
  • 31:58 : Are you part of the training process for writers to understand room etiquette? 
  • 33:02: What is it like being a woman in a leadership position in Hollywood?
  • 53:25 : Do you think you’ve “made it?”
  • 58:00: What advice do you have for students who may be considering a career in the arts during these crazy times?
  • 1:04:16 How are you managing working at home with your spouse? 
  • 1:04:38 How can listeners follow and connect with you?

Key Quotes:

  • “TV production is very fast-paced and, inevitably, your day is never what you expect it to be.” 
  • “I really enjoy change and spontaneity and diversity in my work. I wilt under repetition.” 
  • “You can be on a show with really easy hours, but I’ve been on a lot of high-intensity high-budget shows, which require long hours.”
  • “I can be gone for a three-week chunk and shooting for 12-hour days.”
  • “[When shooting] I don’t control my time. People tell me where to go…they make sure I get to where I need to go.”
  • “The longer you’re in the business the more control you usually have.” 
  • “There’s a hard downside of being away for three weeks; you miss a lot of important things.”
  • “I try to draw my kids into it as much as possible.”
  • “I have control of the jobs that I take, but when you step into a show you don’t know what that’s going to require.”
  • “The first-season shows are like a start-up company; everyone is working hard and has their own job. There’s not a lot of inherent structure–you step in and do a lot of making it your own.” 
  • “There’s always places to go–there’s always lots to learn every time.”
  • “There’s tons of work in television.”
  • “I didn’t even know I wanted to be in TV…I didn’t know my job existed.” 
  • “I grew up with a sort of hope and plan that I would get out of my small town.” 
  • “I wanted to be a writer…I published my own little poetry book when I was in 7th grade.” 
  • “I taught English in Japan and backpacked across the country.”
  • “I take risks everyday.” 
  • “In the writer’s room, there’s a lot of improv.” 
  • “The writer’s room is a very ‘yes-and’ place. There are no bad or stupid ideas.” 
  • “A movie ends, but TV–theoretically–never ends.”
  • “I love being creative all day.” 
  • “I spend a lot of my time trying to channel incredibly intense emotionality and aiming for really hard story targets.”
  • “LA is very expensive… I’ve couch-surfed before, I had no safety net.” 
  • “An essential quality to have to be successful in Hollywood is to be able to live with risk.” 
  • “I think parents need to be wary of giving advice on things they don’t have direct experience with.” 
  • “If your child has a drive to be an artist, throw everything in your power to support them.” 
  • “Being a generalist gets you nothing.”
  • “Who you are is unique and special, and as an artist you’re unique and special.” 
  • “If you feel a calling in your soul to be an artist–or whatever it is–you throw yourself in whole-heartedly, you get your 10,000 hours in, you practice, and that makes you special and unique.” 
  • “TV-writing pays an obscene amount of money.”
  • “Temperament, talent, and force-of-will/persistence are key elements.” 
  • “Take risks as much as possible, be courageous, and don’t be afraid to fail.” 
  • “Make sure what you’re doing as a living is something you can stand to do every day of your life.” 
  • “I don’t mind failing at writing, because it’s learning.” 
  • “I have one thing to say to anyone who wants to follow an artistic career of any kind–it is the truest thing I have found so far in my career–never let anyone tell you who you are.”
  • “Don’t let anybody make you feel small or ‘less-than.’”
  • “Now that I’ve gotten older, I’m grateful for feedback and I’m better at hearing feedback than I used to be.” 

Support the DYBP Podcast! 

…on Instagram! …on Facebook! …and Twitter! 

Let your voice be heard: 

  • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
  • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely. Email Jen, 213-915-6883 text or call

DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith

Podcast, Show Notes

Bonus Episode College Creatives: Advice for Youth

College theatre students share how they are staying creative and productive during times of isolation and uncertainty. All this time at home seems familiar, reminding students of the times they spent entertaining themselves all day as children. While the action figures and Legos are no longer in use, the storytelling remains the same.  They share crafts and activities that elementary through high school students can try out for themselves. Learn more about supporting and collaborating with fellow creatives- they might be just down the hall!

What’s inside:

Join the Ditch Your Back up Plan Community Group

1:14: STERLING OLIVER, Kansas State University

4:39 OLIVIA CARTER, Kansas State University

  • 4:44: Journaling and writing from photographs
  • 5:28: Finding stories outside
  • 6:03: Childhood creativity and painting on walls
  • 6:16: Being a creative kid with a learning disability
  • 7:12: Story telling activity with photos as a writing prompt
  • 7:35: Theatre after quarantine

8:09: JACKSON BERLAND, Kansas State University

  • 8:29: Writing letters to imaginary friends for song lyrics
  • 8:42: Creating characters as a kid
  • 9:20: Collecting things that don’t belong
  • 8:58: Creative Sandwich activity

11:25: KATIE HAYES, Rockford University

  • 11:45: Small projects
  • 11:50: Recreating stories as a young theatre kid
  • 12:27: Embroidery as a hobby

13:29: TRACE CAMPBELL, Kansas State University

  • 13:40: Painting and making sure there is color
  • 13:50: Free time as a kid
  • 14:05: Fight choreography with action figures
  • 14:45: Using your surroundings
  • 15:28: Aluminum foil sculpture/action figure activity

16:48: KENEDI KELLEY, Kansas State University

18:42: TREVOR SEYL, Wichita State University

  • 18:55: Creative time
  • 19:22: Sports kid turned theatre student
  • 19:52: Dancing with the baseball team
  • 20:08: Do something out of your comfort zone

21:34: JACKIE OVASSAPIAN, University of Illinois

  • 21:48: Senior year during quarantine
  • 22:28: Doing creative things for fun
  • 23:05 Watching live theatre online
  • 23:24: Jackie’s creative childhood
  • 23:49: Crafting activities

24:28: ZACHARY SMALLEY, Kansas State University

27:34: GRACE ROUSH, Wichita State University

30:02: DANIEL MASSEY, University of Illinois

  • 30:19: Staying active with sound design
  • 31:03: Keeping off the screen at night
  • 31:24: Legos and music as a kid
  • 31:40: Pick up an instrument or make your own
  • 32:20: Apps for learning music
  • 31:47: Create with your friends

33:27: KRISTEN CRUZ, Kansas State University

Live Theatre/Online Entertainment Selections

Key Quotes:

  • “I’m making sure the walls have color.”
  • “The large majority of my free time was spent in imagination land.”
  • “My eyes would fog over and this world would be in front of me.”
  • “I need to find other ways to be creative on my own. Especially during these times.”
  • “It’s awesome to hear the power of music that you create with only your voice. It’s awesome and I geek out about it all the time.”
  • “Support your fellow artist as we get through it together.”
  • “I’m pretty lucky to be an arts major at this time. My assignments are pretty creative.”
  • “I would imagine what was happening on stage when I would listen to the soundtrack.”
  • “Using music and instruments as a way to stay active and away from a screen at night.”
  • “This is my creative time.”
  • “I went, I auditioned, I got a role, and I haven’t stopped since.”
  • “Sports are creative, but this [Theatre] is what I needed as a kid. [Sports] kind of led me to be a director.”
  • “I made a lot of characters as a kid.”
  • “I had cardboard taped to my head and I was a lunch box for a day.”
  • “But made a sandwich. Sandwiches are tasty.”
  • “It was a literal movie happening in the middle of our living room.”
  • “If there is a project you are working on, put it out there…it would help a lot of people.”

    Support the DYBP Podcast! 

    …on Instagram! …on Facebook! …and Twitter! 

    Let your voice be heard: 

    • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
    • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely. Email Jen, 213-915-6883 text or call

    DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

    Podcast, Show Notes

    Alanna Saunders, Broadway Actor, Episode 13

    Alanna shares her experience as a New York-based Broadway actor–from growing up as a young performer in Seattle to getting her first gig almost immediately after graduating college, to now getting used to life without the constant audition hustle as our global crisis continues to impact theatre professionals. 

    What’s inside: 

    Key Quotes:

    • “[My theatre friends and I] know what unemployment looks like and we know how to take care of ourselves.”
    • “We’re not built to be separated this way.” 
    • “We’re always thinking about how to aid each other without getting in each other’s way.” 
    • “No choice is final.” 
    • “As you learn when you’re in this career longer–there are so many artists who have made their living for years as performers and you don’t know their name. People do make careers without becoming household names.”
    • “I had no expectations about anything, so [Peter Pan] was truly just a joy to do.”
    • “After Harry Potter ended, I felt very lost.”
    • “I was at the theatre 70 hours a week. It was all-consuming and I loved it, but my outside life fell apart a little bit.” 
    • “I didn’t quite know how to exist in the world.”
    • “I decided that I couldn’t get out of my own way–I was constantly worrying about what other people might or might not be thinking or feeling–I was consumed in everybody else’s thoughts.”
    • “Because of the retreat I was able to figure out myself so that way I could love myself.”
    • “I have to come back to myself; otherwise if you give with expectation, it will destroy you–it destroyed me.” 
    • “I learned what it is to live and love and not expect anything in return.”
    • “I suggest for all humans to go travel by yourself because there’s something to being truly by yourself, in a foreign place where you’re not comfortable that really allows you to figure out whatever you need to figure out.”
    • “I don’t really think there’s an end goal–a ‘made it.’”
    • “I’ve made a living doing this, but I’ve been unemployed probably just as much as I’ve been employed.”
    • “I always joke that every time I leave a job, I might never get work again.”
    • “Nothing means anything.” 
    • “Physical health is pretty much everything to me.”
    • “I will never take what my body can do for granted–I love feeling strong, I love what my body can do.” 
    • “My physical health directly coincides with my mental health. When I stop working out and being active, it’s amazing how quickly I deteriorate in my mental health.” 
    • “Physical fitness provides me with strength and the ability to move through the world with confidence.” 
    • “Spiritual strength has helped me set and cross mental and physical boundaries.” 
    • “You gotta do what feels right until it doesn’t feel right anymore.” 
    • “I’ve learned to be passionate and caring and thorough and to know that every decision is not final.” 
    • “Show up and do your job really well–be true to your artistic self and also professional” 
    • “Be yourself–no one is going to ask you to be anything but you, so be able to show up and do what you do to the best of your ability because you’ve prepped, done the work, put aside time.”
    • “The vast majority of the time it won’t be given to you, but you must be able to walk into a room and do the same thing–ground it in yourself.” 

    Support the DYBP Podcast! 

    …on Instagram! …on Facebook! …and Twitter! 

    Let your voice be heard: 

    • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
    • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely. Email Jen, 213-915-6883 text or call

    DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

    DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith

    Podcast, Show Notes

    Show Notes: Jenna Rubaii, Broadway Actor, Episode 12

    Jenna Rubaii shares what it’s like to be on the 50th Anniversary Tour of Jesus Christ Superstar, the importance of flexibility during inevitable career ups-and-downs, and what she’s learned along the way. 

    What’s inside: 

    Connect with Jenna! 

    …on Facebook!!

    …on Instagram!!

    Key Quotes:

    • “Just let things go and let life happen.”
    • “Flexibility is a huge thing to remember–and know that change is inevitable.” 
    • “Day-in-the-life right now means making sure I’m mentally well before the shows.”
    • “Find a way to perform as much as possible.”
    • “Just get yourself to do things.”
    • “You yourself have to love this. It doesn’t matter what other people feel about it…because everyone’s going to have opinions on what you should and shouldn’t do.” 
    • “The hard thing is you don’t know if you’re going to work…so much of it depends on other people’s decisions.”
    • “Continually love your own individuality.”
    • “Embrace what’s unique about you–and don’t shy away from that. Your quirks might get you a job.”
    • “It’s a lot of work. It’s an everyday challenge for all of us.”
    • “I appreciate the ups and downs because it makes you cherish the ups so much more.” 
    • “The most important thing is finding something that is going to be good for you, that will make you happy.”
    • “My biggest lifesaver was collaborating and making my own art.” 
    • “Continue to create your own work and put it out there as much as possible.”
    • “As long as you’re working, progressing, and taking big leaps in your work–you’re doing well.” 
    • “Get out and see as much as you can, do as much as you can, even if it’s not your favorite thing or it’s scary to you, just try it and that will enrich your artistic life.” 

    Support the DYBP Podcast! 

    …on Instagram! …on Facebook! …and Twitter! 

    Let your voice be heard: 

    • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
    • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely. Email Jen, 213-915-6883 text or call

    DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

    DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith 

    Podcast, Show Notes

    Show Notes: Logan Jones, General Manager and Production Stage Manager, Episode 11

    Logan Jones shares how he went from being an unpaid apprentice to becoming a full-time theatre artist in the Chicago theatre scene in the span of just five years; spoiler–it has a lot to do with saying yes to every opportunity, and finding mentors who support a path of lifelong learning.

    What’s inside: 

    • Donate to The Actors Fund
    • Join the Ditch Your Back up Plan Community Group
    • 2:08 : Where are you calling from?
    • 2:12 : How long have you been in Chicago?
    • 2:25 : What’s your career like now? 
    • 2:57 : How are you able to juggle multiple jobs in one company?
    • 3:23 : What’s a typical day-in-the-life for you?
    • 4:06 : Is this season of your work daytime work?
    • 4:40 : Is your position freelanced?
    • 5:16 : How did you get your job?
    • 5:35 : When you left K-State what were you hoping to do for your career?
    • 8:05 : What is the mission of About Face Theatre?
    • 8:45 : Where does your time at Windy City Playhouse fit into your story?
    • 9:32 : Was your involvement in immersive theatre by design?
    • 10:54 : What makes Chicago theatre unique?
    • 11:44 : Was it a goal to stay within the Midwest?
    • 12:30 : How was your life growing up in Kansas different from your life now?
    • 12:55 : Were your parents supportive of your career dreams?
    • 13:26 : Did you know you were going to attend a university in your home state?
    • 15:30: How do you work hard without burning out?
    • 16:19 : Did you have a back-up plan?
    • 17:35 : What’s the biggest risk you’ve taken?
    • 17:51 : Did you have a survival job in the beginning?
    • 20:35 : What about a corporate environment was not a good fit for you?
    • 21:19 : What rewards have you gotten from this career that your younger self would find unbelievable?
    • 22:15 : What advice would you give someone wanting the same type of traction you have?
    • 23:11 : How does “the right place at the right time” and luck play into a career in the arts?
    • 24:25 : Do you have any regrets within these 5 years?
    • 24:43 : Do you feel like you’ve “made it”?
    • 25:06 : How long did it take until you were making your living in theatre?
    • 25:26 : Is there a particular type of artist who finds their way to Chicago?
    • 27:15 : Is there anyone who inspired you to be where you are today? See it to be it. 
    • 30:08 : What should people know about About Face Theatre Company?
    • 31:05 : Is there anything you’d like to recommend?
    • 33:35 : What’s the next show for About Face?
    •  33:15 :  How can listeners connect with you?

    Key Quotes:

    • “[Chicago theatre] is the kind of market that gives lots of opportunities to young artists.” 
    • “I got here by saying yes to every opportunity early on and learning as I go.”
    • “The best piece of advice I was ever given is: Say yes until you can’t.”
    • “You never know what door is going to open from the experience you think doesn’t align with your career goals, and who knows what the person you’re working with is going to find for you after that. As long as you don’t burn yourself out, saying ‘yes’ to those experiences really can open new doors. ” 
    • “Looking back five years ago, when I was picturing where I’d be in 10-15 years, I’m there right now. So that’s the biggest reward for me.”
    • “You really can’t get anything without asking.”
    • “You’re not really going to get anywhere if you’re doing everything on your own. Especially in the arts community, there is a huge sense of community in wanting to lift up young voices…you really are able to make those connections just by asking.” 
    • “If you do land a job and you do your best work, everyone is going to see that and want to work with you again.”
    • “I think it’s great for everyone across the board to have training in multiple areas–not just because it makes them more marketable and different, but it also gives you the skills to be a better collaborator.”

    Connect with Logan! …on Instagram!

    Support the DYBP Podcast! 

    …on Instagram! …on Facebook! …and Twitter! 

    Let your voice be heard: 

    • Share your story on social media–use #DYBPcast !
    • Ask questions, make comments, express yourself freely. Email Jen, 213-915-6883 text or call

    DYBP graphic design  © 2020 by Laura Gernon

    DYBP theme song, “Ditch” © 2020 by Dean Keith